The Earth: The Best High-Resolution Photo of EARTH EVER

The Earth: The Best High-Resolution Photo of EARTH EVER 

 

 

A Russian weather satellite, Electro-L, has taken some incredable photos of the Earth, possibly the best photos of Earth to date.  The satellite orbits the earth, about the equator, and snaps images every thirty minutes.  Robert Simmons, a NASA scientist as NASA's Earth Observatory told Gizmodo:

 

Elektro-L is a Russian Satellite similar to GOES (the satellites that provide the cloud image loops shown on the news every night). The images posted by Gizmodo are a combination of visible and near-infrared wavelengths, so they show the Earth in a way not visible to human eyes (vegetation looks red, for example). They're not any better or worse than NASA images, but they show different things.

 

 

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SUPERMOON GREAT SATURDAY

SUPERMOON GREAT SATURDAY

 

 

Last night was "Super Moon Saturday" and it didn't disappoint.  The moon shown brightly all around the world and many people took photos to celebrate the one night where the moon will show the brightest of the year.   Supermoon occurred at 11:34 EST.  The moon was 221,802 miles away from the earth and appeared 30% brighter and 14% larger than normal as it approached Earth, NASA reports.  It is referred to as "supermoon" because it is a noticeable alignment.  

 

 

 

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Blue Marble II: Nasa Releases Another High HD Image of Earth

Blue Marble II:  Nasa Releases Another High HD Image of Earth

 

 

By popular demand, NASA, has released yet another high-hd photograph of the Eastern Hemisphere of the Earth.  It has been viewed on Flickr more than 3.1 million times.  The photos are breath-taking and give you a rare look at earth in a advanced way.

Per NASA:

The new image is a composite of six separate orbits taken on January 23, 2012 by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. Both of these new 'Blue Marble' images are images taken by a new instrument flying aboard Suomi NPP, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS).





Compiled by NASA Goddard scientist Norman Kuring, this image has the perspective of a viewer looking down from 7,918 miles (about 12,742 kilometers) above the Earth's surface from a viewpoint of 10 degrees South by 45 degrees East. The four vertical lines of 'haze' visible in this image shows the reflection of sunlight off the ocean, or 'glint,' that VIIRS captured as it orbited the globe. Suomi NPP is the result of a partnership between NASA, NOAA and the Department of Defense.





Using a basketball you can get a good idea of how far away the Suomi NPP satellite is from Earth. Take a basketball that has a diameter of 10 inches (about 25 centimeters) and say that's 'Earth.' (For the record, Earth has a diameter of about 7,926 miles (about 12,756 kilometers)).





So to get the same view of Earth as the VIIRS instrument aboard the Suomi NPP satellite, hold the basketball five-eighth of an inch (about one-and-a-half centimeters) away from your face.





The actual swath width of the Earth's surface covered by each pass of VIIRS as the satellite orbits the Earth is about 1,865 miles (about 3,001 kilometers). On the basketball that's about two and one-third inches (about six centimeters).

 

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Earth 360: A Beautiful Look at the World We Live In

The Blue Marble

 

The Blue Marble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For those that haven't heard yet, Wednesday, NASA issued a new photo version of the Earth they called "The Blue Marble".  They say it is the most detailed "true image' of Earth to date.  It makes you think of how far we have come in this digital age and have a great appreciation of the World in which we live.  

NASA states:

"Much of the information contained in this image came from a single remote-sensing device-NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Flying over 700 km above the Earth onboard the Terra satellite, MODIS provides an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of these images are based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the sensor’s view of the surface on any single day."

This is truly a modern day marvel.

 

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